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UNTITLED ART MIAMI BEACH 
 
DECEMBER 6 – 10, 2023

BOOTH B24

For the 2023 edition of Untitled Miami Beach, Fridman Gallery is honored to present works by Debra Cartwright, Hana Yilma Godine, Alina Grasmann, Fidelis Joseph, Wura-Natasha Ogunji, Sahana Ramakrishnan, and Adelisa Selimbasic

Adelisa Selimbasic  Porcelain, 2023  Oil on canvas, 75.5 x 53.5"

Adelisa Selimbasic’s layered, luminous paintings depict an unconventional perception of the body, with distinctly feminine and not objectified sensuality. Selimbasic wants viewers to accept their own bodies as alive, authentic and perfectly normal, with all the cellulite, stretch marks, wide hips and scars.
The exaggeration of scale, the subtle distortion of perspective, and the slightly
strained poses of the elongated figures recall the Mannerist style of the 16th
century High Renaissance, with its emphasis on emotion over naturalistic representation. In Selimbasic’s vivid paintings the bodies are vessels that communicate histories – genetic, communal and lived.

Adelisa Selimbasic

Porcelain, 2023

Oil on canvas, 75.5 x 53.5"

Adelisa Selimbasic  Glitter Party, 2023  Oil on canvas, 45.66 x 45.66"
Adelisa Selimbasic  Witnesses, 2023  Oil on canvas, 77 x 115"

Adelisa Selimbasic

Witnesses, 2023

Oil on canvas, 77 x 115"

Adelisa Selimbasic

Glitter Party, 2023

Oil on canvas, 45.66 x 45.66"

Adelisa Selimbasic  Birth mark, 2023  Oil on canvas, 69 x76.5"

Adelisa Selimbasic

Birth mark, 2023

Oil on canvas, 69 x76.5"

Adelisa Selimbasic  Icing, 2023  Oil on canvas, 66 x 66"

Adelisa Selimbasic

Icing, 2023

Oil on canvas, 66 x 66"

Hana Yilma Godine’s use of flattened perspective, elongated figures, and evenly distributed light recalls Ethiopian iconography which underscores the divinity of biblical subjects by rejecting rules of earthly representation. At the same time, Godine’s works are firmly grounded in reality – she paints on traditional Ethiopian fabrics which women typically source at the local market and turn into affordable dresses. Godine weaves her brushstrokes in and around the fabric print, at times leaving the flowery patterns untouched, at times letting them glimmer through the painted layers.

Hana Yilma Godine  Single painting #2, 2022  Oil, acrylic, fabric on canvas, 80 x 80"

Hana Yilma Godine

Single painting #2, 2022

Oil, acrylic, fabric on canvas, 80 x 80"

Alina Grasmann  The Idol of the Cyclades (Room 7), 2022  Oil on canvas, 51 x 71"

Alina Grasmann

The Idol of the Cyclades (Room 7), 2022

Oil on canvas, 51 x 71"

Alina Grasmann is a realist painter whose large-scale, site-specific series blur fact and fiction. Her works are inspired by her travels, American architecture, film, and literature. Each series contains about 10–15 paintings, all based on specific locations. Grasmann researches places and then visits

them in real life, recording her experiences and the atmosphere through photographs. Drawn to the narratives of each place, she compares the reality and sensation of the place with the way she imagined it would be, then makes interventions by changing or adding objects, or erasing parts. Rather than illustrating existing myths about a place, she aims to create space for association

so new stories emerge.

Fidelis Joseph  Ijantawa, 2021  Oil on canvas, 260 x 47.5"

Fidelis Joseph’s painting practice fuses his life experiences in Nigeria and the U.S. Moving from figuration to abstraction, he evades straight-line narratives, focusing instead on complex impressions and emotions embedded in the human psyche. Uncanny figures emerge from landscapes of bright color blocks, transparent paint and bare canvas. His rapid and energetic brushstrokes bring palpable tension.

Fidelis Joseph

Ijantawa, 2021

Oil on canvas, 260 x 47.5"

Fidelis Joseph  Sukur Kingdom Journey into Adulthood, 2023  Oil, spray paint, and enamel on canvas, 84 x 98"

Fidelis Joseph

Sukur Kingdom Journey into Adulthood, 2023

Oil, spray paint, and enamel on canvas, 84 x 98"

Wura-Natasha Ogunji works in drawing, painting, performance, and video. In many of her drawings Ogunji explores water as architecture – lagoons rendered in ink, stitched lines of a river, or the empty space of the paper itself (an imagined expanse of sea). The work also often develops around language. As the artist creates, titles emerge and become the structure determining the form of the pieces.

Wura-Natasha Ogunji  Everything Was Lost and Found, 2023  Thread, ink, graphite on tracing paper, 24 x 24"

Wura-Natasha Ogunji

Everything Was Lost and Found, 2023

Thread, ink, graphite on tracing paper, 24 x 24"

Wura-Natasha Ogunji  The One Where We're All Together, 2023  Thread, ink, graphite on tracing paper, 24 x 24"

Wura-Natasha Ogunji

The One Where We're All Together, 2023

Thread, ink, graphite on tracing paper, 24 x 24"

Wura-Natasha Ogunji  Let The River Take Us, 2022  Thread, ink, graphite on tracing paper, 24 x 24"

Wura-Natasha Ogunji

Let The River Take Us, 2022

Thread, ink, graphite on tracing paper, 24 x 24"

Debra Cartwright  Fistula, 2022  Oil on Canvas, 60 x 48"

Debra Cartwright is interested in depicting the relationship between the black female body and American medical history. She uses paint and mixed media to explore selfhood and her own positioning as the daughter of a gynecologist. Themes in her work include reembodiment, myth creation, violence, theft and intimacy. She explores a critical understanding of the past while also examining the current American healthcare system.

Debra Cartwright

Fistula, 2022

Oil on Canvas, 60 x 48"

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Debra Cartwright

Horizon, 2022

Oil on Canvas, 48x 60"

Debra Cartwright  Manifest Destiny, 2022  Oil on Canvas, 48x 60"

Debra Cartwright

Manifest Destiny, 2022

Oil on Canvas, 48x 60"

Sahana Ramakrishnan  Echo, 2023, Oil, graphite, rhinestones, gold leaf on canvas, 12 x 10 x 1.5"

Sahana Ramakrishnan’s paintings explore the concept of non-duality,
central to Hinduism and Buddhism. The Western-European tradition––with its
emphasis on the distinction between the subject and the object, between the
rational mind and the examined world––has led, inevitably, to the fracturing of
the social fabric and the wealth gap that accompanies unchecked individual-
ism. From this standpoint, Ramakrishnan uses her paintings to contemplate
death, identity, and the consumption and killing of “other” sentient beings.

Sahana Ramakrishnan

Echo, 2023, Oil, graphite, rhinestones, gold leaf on canvas, 12 x 10 x 1.5"

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